Thyroid Strong

There’s a plethora of health problems associated with mold exposure, one of them no one talks about, which is mold diminishes our ability to maintain our muscle tissue. Since mold exposure symptoms are almost identical to the symptoms of Hashimoto’s, mold symptoms can be hard to diagnose.

The design of your home significantly impacts the potential for mold growth. Breathable building materials and dehumidifiers will help a lot. However, you must stay vigilant because mold can creep up nearly anywhere.

About Dr. Jill Crista

Dr. Jill Crista ND is a naturopathic physician in southwest Wisconsin. Her practice focuses on taking on patients suffering from the effects of mold exposure and Lyme disease. She’s on a mission to educate the public about the dangers of water damage and mold to keep them and their families safe and healthy.

Mold is Everywhere, But it Doesn’t Mean You Should Suffer From Exposure

Even the most common molds can have negative health impacts. The factors behind how mold affects different people include the size of the dose, duration, and susceptibility. Even your genetic makeup and your nutrient intake are also factors.

Discovering mold in your home can be devastating. A proper mold inspector, remediation, and cleaning afterward are very expensive. Moving is seldom an option unless you have the financial means. But living with constant exposure will take its toll, especially for the ladies with Hashimoto’s. There are steps you can take to help. From not storing cardboard in the cellar to building with specialized materials, you can make it harder for mold to take hold in the first place.

Mold’s Effects on Your Health

Since mold toxins are fat-soluble, they can travel nearly anywhere in the body. This can create a whole host of symptoms. For this reason, mold exposure can be challenging to diagnose correctly. Even anxiousness, ear-ringing, and pelvic pain can be a result. With so many possible effects, you and your doctor must discover how mold impacts your health.

Mold will even impact your muscles. Since many mold mycotoxins act as protein synthesis inhibitors, your muscles may not recover after they break down. That’s why mold exposure directly contributes to the loss of muscle mass. While all this can seem frightening, Dr. Crista shares some steps you can take immediately to get back on track.

Have you had to deal with toxic mold exposure? What do you do to rid mold from your life? Tell me in the comments below!

In this episode

  • The reasons why some people are more affected by mold than others [2:10]
  • Why mold exposure is the “great imitator” of other diseases [8:43]
  • The detoxification symptoms that can occur after mold exposure [12:07]
  • How to detect mold inside your home [17:24]
  • Different reactions for men and women [20:40]
  • Designing your home to be resistant to mold [23:27]
  • How to discover if you have mold in your system [32:32]
  • Why chemical sensitivity often accompanies mold exposure [42:15]
  • How mold affects muscle tissue [46:39]
  • Simple steps to recovery [49:38]

Quotes

“The toxins that come from mold in an indoor environment are biowarfare weapons.” [2:30]

“Mold has a very important job in nature which is to decompose dead, previously organic material. What do we build our houses with? Dead organic material.” [14:15]

“There’s a lot of things the liver is supposed to be doing. Those activities get gummed up when you’re exposed to mycotoxins.” [43:25]

“When you move a muscle you can damage it. That’s the whole idea of gaining muscle. As you break it down, it will build up bigger. If you have mold on board, you don’t get the repair part.” [48:14]

Links

Find Dr. Jill Crista online

Follow Dr. Crista on Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest

Prescriptions for a Healthy House by Paula Baker-Laporte

Mold Quiz

Follow Emily on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube | TikTok

Learn the 3 things NOT TO DO in your workout if you have Hashimoto's and WHAT TO DO instead!

Sign up to our newsletter and we'll email you this free guide.

You have Successfully Subscribed!

Pin It on Pinterest